Looks like a commando Tom Stone Action Team doll.


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In addition to special exhibits like this one, every 3 months MUJAM hosts a lucha-libre heavy collectors bazaar. Keep up with it, here. Or, on the Collecart Facebook page.

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In addition to the Shimizu family, the museum staff includes tour guides (who double as security), as well as two cooks in the downstairs cafe section.  They prepare boxed food on Saturdays.

A friend of Shimizu´s sons, taking a break in the eating area with a visitor, told me a bit about the family´s history.  Shimizu´s family was part of the first wave of agricultural migrants to Chiapas.  The family moved to D.F., bought an apartment building and opened a candy and paper store.  The same family building houses the museum and others.

Japanese culture website Isefoundation.org, explains the general history:

The infamous Mexican President Porfirio Diaz was the first foreign leader to sign a friendship and trade pact with Japan in 1888 and the first Latin American leader to encourage Japanese emigration. Lasting evidence of this gesture is still to be found in the farming town of Acacoyagua in Chiapas, Mexico’s largest concentration of Japanese descendants. Today, an estimated 15,000 Japanese Mexicans live among a national population of more than 100 million.

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This was a personal favorite. Who doesn´t remember Buck Rogers?

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Shmizu´s collection did contain at least one figure that raised our eyebrows.

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¨El Negro¨ is the prize of Schmizus´ collection.  According to a brochure the museum sells for $10 pesos, it was the attraction at nightclub El Colonia in D.F.  The piano player sat inside the mouth, with the dancers outside. The club, according to the MUJAM blog, was popular in the 30s and 50s. The eyes of the art deco piece moved, as well as the maracas he was holding.

If you´re in Mexico, check out the toy museum. On Saturday afternoons, cooks serve up Japanese style lunches. Food choices range from sushi to fried rice, priced under $50 pesos.

Museo del Juguete Antiguo; Monday – Friday, 9-5, Saturday 9-1, Closed Sundays; Dr. Olvera 15, Col. Doctores, 06720; 55-88-2100



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